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COVID-19 in 19: U.S. Employer Guidance for Reopening the Workplace

Increased discussion of reopening the U.S. economy has raised numerous questions as employers prepare to return their employees to the workplace. In just the last week, President Trump’s White House issued its Opening Up America Again three-phased approach for re-opening the economy, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission issued guidance about returning to work, and the states of Texas, Georgia, South Carolina and Vermont have issued plans to rescind their shelter in place orders in phases – all while other states have extended their shelter in place orders. While there is no single roadmap to reopening in these continuing uncertain times, employers should begin to consider what measures will help ensure a safe, orderly return to business.

Join us for this 19-minute discussion on these and other rapidly changing guidelines.

Event Details

Date Tuesday, April 28, 2020 Time 1 p.m. to 1:19 p.m. PDT 2 p.m. to 2:19 p.m. MDT 3 p.m. to 3:19 p.m. CDT 4 p.m. to 4:19 p.m. EDT

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COVID-19: Four Steps to Help Protect Supply Chains in Face of Shelter-in-Place Orders

Effective March 17, 2020, San Francisco and six other Bay Area counties passed “Shelter in Place” ordinances preventing workers not engaged in providing Essential Activities, working at Essential Businesses or providing Essential Government Services from leaving their homes to go to work. Such laws are now being considered throughout the country. This alert provides actionable steps companies can take to ensure that Shelter in Place laws in their jurisdictions do not inadvertently block employees from getting to work at their Essential Businesses.

First, be proactive, contact your state and local government officials to make sure they understand why your business is essential. If your product or service is truly essential, no government official is going to want to be blamed for inadvertently causing a shortage of that product. Note the Bay Area Orders define Essential Businesses to include “Businesses that supply other essential businesses with the support or supplies necessary to operate.” If your business falls into that category, you may want to have that business explicitly enumerated as an Essential Business rather than rely on a judgment call that this catch all provision applies. To proceed, identify to make sure they know. BCLP can help (a) identify the appropriate officials at the State and local level and reach out to them, (b) develop the message to be delivered as to why your employees should not be required to Shelter In Place and (c) draft language to clarify why your business and its supply chain should be exempt from the

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