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U.S. COVID-19: Biometrics and Business Re-Opening

Now that wearing gloves has become the new normal because of the COVID-19 pandemic, biometric privacy litigation, which in recent years has centered on employers’ use of finger-scan timekeeping technology, may ultimately shift in focus to the measures that businesses implement as employees return to the workplace and customers begin to frequent their favorite establishments.  Body temperature checks, used to screen employees and visitors for a fever, are one such measure being considered as a first line of defense for public health.

To mount a defense against, or avoid altogether, biometric privacy class action litigation, businesses open to the public and employers must have a comprehensive understanding of the thermometer or thermal imaging technology selected—and the data it captures—before rolling out temperature screenings on a widespread basis.  Among the technologies available are:

  • Non-contact infrared thermometers that use lasers to measure temperature from a distance;
  • Thermal imaging cameras that detect

COVID-19 in 19: Workplace Temperature Screening: Who, Where and How

The notion that U.S. employers would engage in broad-scale temperature screening of employees and visitors would have once been unthinkable. But the realities of COVID-19 are changing the workplace, as least for the time-being. With the encouragement of the CDC and certain state and local governments, and a green light from the EEOC, many employers are implementing daily temperature screening as one means of keeping their employees healthy. As part of our continuing series of 19-minute teleconferences on the impacts of COVID-19, join us as we discuss best practices for temperature screening and highlight potential issues employers should keep in mind.

Event Details

Date Tuesday, May 5, 2020 Time 1 p.m. to 1:19 p.m. PDT 2 p.m. to 2:19 p.m. MDT 3 p.m. to 3:19 p.m. CDT 4 p.m. to 4:19 p.m. EDT

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U.S. COVID-19: New CDC Guidance Allows Potentially-Exposed “Critical Infrastructure Workers” to Remain at Work – with Precautions

April 23, 2020

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”) recently issued guidance applicable to “critical infrastructure workers,” and safety precautions employers should take when those workers are potentially exposed to COVID-19.

The CDC has generally recommended that any individual who has recently been in close contact with a person with COVID-19 (someone in their household or family member) should “self-quarantine” at home for at least 14 days, self-monitor for symptoms consistent with COVID-19, and check his or her temperature twice a day. Some employers have been applying this guidance to their employees, instructing any employee with a potential exposure to self-quarantine at home for 14 days.

Recognizing that certain essential businesses and functions need to continue operating even during the pandemic, the CDC has now updated its guidance for “critical infrastructure workers,” as defined by the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (“CISA”). Personnel (including contracted vendors) in

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