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Beware of Making Unsubstantiated Anti-Aging Claims

Manufacturers, distributors, and retailers often tout the anti-aging effects of certain cosmetics and nutritional supplements. Of course, the term “anti-aging” is not intended to literally mean that a product prevents aging. To the contrary, it is understood by both the industry and consumers as describing a product that is designed to mitigate, mask, or soften certain cosmetic indicators that come with age. These typically include wrinkles, discoloration, greying of the hair, or a loss of skin firmness.

Anti-aging litigation has proven popular with the plaintiffs’ bar. In the past five years, there have been at least 31 class action complaints filed alleging deceptive advertising of anti-aging products, and at least 10 enforcement actions brought by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

Often such putative class actions allege that advertising which touts a product’s anti-aging properties is deceptive and misleading to consumers. Typically, complaints over anti-aging claims lack affirmative evidence that a

“Made in USA” Claims Can Be Considered Deceptive Unless Substantiated

Although every product (unless excepted) that is imported into the United States must be marked with its country of origin pursuant to Section 304 of the Tariff Act of 1930, most products manufactured domestically are not required to list the United States as the country of origin. However, if manufacturers or retailers do choose to market their products as “Made in the USA,” these claims must be substantiated, or risk being considered deceptive under federal or state law.

On the federal level, the Federal Trade Commission has issued guidelines and considers representations that a product is “Made in the USA” to be deceptive, unless (1) “all or virtually all” of a product’s components are of U.S. origin, and (2) “all or virtually all” processing takes place in the United States.  Furthermore, the FTC considers phrases such as “Produced in the USA,” “Built in the USA,” or “Manufactured in