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California Enacts New Law Expanding Parental Leave to Small Employers

California Governor Jerry Brown has signed a new law that extends twelve weeks of unpaid parental leave to California employees who work for small businesses, including retailers.  The New Parent Leave Act applies generally to California employers with at least 20 and no more than 49 employees.  The practical effect of the Act is to expand the parental leave required under the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and the California Family Rights Act (CFRA) to smaller employers.  The new law takes effect on January 1, 2018.

Under the New Parent Leave Act, an employee may take up to twelve weeks of unpaid parental leave within one year of a child’s birth, adoption, or foster care placement, so long as the employee (1) works at a location where the employer has at least 20 employees within a 75 mile radius, (2) has at least twelve months of service with

New Colorado Laws Grant Employees Access to Personnel Files, Right to Pregnancy Accommodations

The Colorado General Assembly ended the 2016 session by passing significant employment legislation. In June 2016, Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper signed into law House Bill 16-1432, granting employees access to personnel files upon request, and House Bill 16-1438 expanding protections for pregnant employees. All Colorado employers should familiarize themselves with these new laws and update related policies before they take effect.

PERSONNEL FILES

House Bill 16-1432 grants current and former employees the right to access their personnel files upon request. When the Act takes effect, likely on January 1, 2017, the provisions will be found at C.R.S. § 8-2-129.

Summary

This new law provides current and former employees access to their personnel files and allows current employees to obtain a copy of their personnel files.

Defining “Personnel Files”

The Act defines personnel files as “the personnel records of an employee, in the manner maintained by the employer and using reasonable efforts by the

The New FLSA Regulations: Impact Will Be More Than Just Higher Salaries for Exempt Employees

As has been widely publicized in the press, on May 18, 2016, the U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) released the final rule updating the regulations regarding the white collar exemptions from overtime compensation under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”). These regulations apply to workers who fall under the executive, administrative, or professional exemptions from the FLSA’s minimum wage and overtime protections as well as to the highly compensated employee.  The new regulations will likely be challenged, but, barring a court injunction or other action, they will go into effect on December 1, 2016. While the DOL did not alter the duties test for the overtime exemptions, the impact on employers will be much more profound than just higher salary levels.

THE NEW REGULATIONS

Under the new regulations:

  • The salary threshold increases from $455 per week (i.e., $23,660 per year) to $913 per week (i.e., $47,476 per year).
  • The total
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